What Can Cause A Deviated Septum?

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Deviated Septum

A deviated septum can result from injury or trauma during birth, an allergic reaction, or scratching the inside of your nose too often. A deviated septum may also present alongside pneumonia, asthma, chronic sinusitis, and other health conditions. In most cases, a minor surgical procedure is required to correct a deviated septum. Below are some of the causes of a deviated septum.

causes of a deviated septum

Injury or Trauma

Injury or Trauma

During birth, damage can be done to the cartilage of the nose to form a deviated septum. The cartilage is hardened like a strap and lies between the two nostrils, holding them in place. Therefore, any injury to this cartilage during birth can cause a deviated septum. By far, the most common cause is trauma, with roughly 60% of cases occurring from birth trauma. In comparison, 30% are caused by injury or trauma throughout life (especially during sports, martial arts activities, or horseback riding). Other causes include infections, chronic sinusitis and viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, scarring, and allergic reactions.

Environmental Allergies

Allergic reactions to pollen or other substances in the air in your environment due to seasonal allergies, dust mites, and pet dander can all cause a deviated septum, as well as dried nasal mucus. If you are allergic to these airborne particles, your body over-produces mucus, which can then clog up your sinuses. It leads to sinus infections which then cause swelling inside your nose. The swelling of the vessel walls may result in a bulging of the septum or deviation from its normal position. It is especially true for deviated septums caused by seasonal allergies, as these will recur each year.

Also read Best Vitamins For Strengthening Your Immune System.

Scratching the Inside of Your Nose

Scratching the Inside of Your Nose

Excessive scratching or rubbing the inside of the nostrils can cause bleeding and damage the tissue inside your nose. It can result in a deviated septum if not treated effectively. If you are experiencing a deviated septum due to excessive scratching, it should be treated to prevent future problems with your nose and sinuses. In some cases, surgery may also be required to correct this issue.

Pregnancy

As you may know, the human body is constantly changing during pregnancy, which often results in a fall of the arch of your nose. The nose’s cartilage can become exposed if bones no longer support it due to changes in shape during pregnancy and birth. It can allow an opening between the cartilage and bone, leading to a deviated septum. You also may have noticed that your nose appears more petite than usual during this time. It is because the muscles around your nostrils are weakened, causing them not to support the bridge.

Pregnancy can also be a risk factor for the development of sinusitis and other chronic conditions such as allergies. However, if your pregnancy is not causing problems, you don’t need to worry too much about this condition. However, it should be noted that children who have had a deviated nose before the age of three are more likely to develop this same problem again.

Fever

Fever

Very high fevers can cause your body to secrete a lot of mucus. This mucus can block the nostrils and cause congestion inside your nose and sinuses. It is particularly true for infants and young children who have not yet developed strong resistance against infections or diseases. The mucus itself can also clog up your nose and interfere with the effectiveness of medications you may take to treat flu or cold symptoms.

Muscle Weakness

Sinusitis, allergies, an upper respiratory infection (especially a sinus infection or sinusitis), and fungal infections of the throat and nose can all weaken muscles around your nose. It, in turn, can cause an opening between the cartilage and bone called a fistula, which can become infected or infected with bacteria. A deviated septum is then formed due to swelling around the nostrils.

Bone Absorption Disorders

Some bone absorption disorders may cause the bone to weaken in areas that include the cartilage and bone. It can cause the septum to drop and become deviated; however, it may simply increase pressure in these areas in severe cases. For example, conditions such as Marfan syndrome can lead to a weakening of the cartilage in your nose, which then causes it to drop down or be pushed out, resulting in a deviated septum.

Older Adults

Older Adults

Developing a deviated septum at an older age is more common among women. It is not clear why this is the case, as older men are not known to develop this condition in such high numbers. It may be due to hormonal changes during menopause or from the increased pressure in the nose caused by bone osteoporosis. A deviated septum can also be brought on by certain medications to treat depression or high blood pressure and other conditions such as heart failure or diabetes.

Craniosynostosis

The risk of a deviated septum increases with abnormalities in the fetal development of the cranial nerves, which are involved in balance and coordination. As you may know, your brain is formed during pregnancy, including the formation of one or more nerves. These nerves control different aspects of your ability to walk and move and speak. If these are underdeveloped or fused, this can cause an abnormality resulting in a deviated septum.

Genetic Anomalies

Genetic Anomalies

Deviated septums are more likely to develop due to chromosomal abnormalities and mutations within the genes that make up the proteins required for the sinus cavity. It happens in rare cases in people carriers of sickle cell anemia. This disease causes blood cells to become long and misshapen, leading to excess blood flow within the sinuses. As well as causing an increased risk of a deviated septum, this can also lead to other conditions such as cerebral palsy.

Conclusion

Any of the causes listed above can lead to a deviated septum, particularly when present at an early age. However, a deviated septum is also one of the most common types of nose deformity that can be fixed through rhinoplasty, also known as nose correction surgery or septoplasty. The procedure is usually performed by a physician who performs cosmetic surgery or an otolaryngologist (ear-nose-throat specialist).